132 Authority Ln, Sebring, Florida 33870, United States

863-655-2002

Sebring Flight Academy "Landing Doctor Certified"

Welcome to Sebring Flight Academy
Affordable-professional pilot training

   

The Landing Doctor 

KEY PHRASES March 2019

1. During climb out we repeat numerous times, 

“YOU MUST SEE OVER THE NOSE”

“YOU MUST SEE OVER THE NOSE”

“YOU MUST SEE OVER THE NOSE”

During climb you need to lower your nose to achieve Vy plus 10 knots before making any turns. We call the Vmcs…velocity maneuvering climb speed. You should lower your nose in all turns close to the ground, especially while in the traffic pattern.  


2. For Stalls- “We do imminent stalls and during the recovery use the words, “EASE OFF THE BACK PRESSURE”.

 (Departure stalls are only practiced with a CFI in the right seat.) 


3. For the GLIDE- “When we close the throttle and put the plane in a power off glide, we must lower the nose so the wing will continue to produce lift and keep us safe. Say the words below numerous times during the glide.
 “YOU MUST LOWER THE NOSE TO KEEP US SAFE”

“YOU MUST LOWER THE NOSE TO KEEP US SAFE”

“YOU MUST LOWER THE NOSE TO KEEP US SAFE”.


4. During landings, we say, “KEEP THE NOSE DOWN TO KEEP US SAFE AND MAINTAIN OUR INERTIA. Keep the nose down until you are the height of a car, at which time you will add some back pressure and fly level down the runway. Focus your eyes down the runway to the end of the runway. This is the EYE transition point. By focusing on the trees at the end of the runway you will easily see when the plane begins to lose some altitude. As the plane loses altitude you slowly add some back pressure to slow the descent. 


www.landingdoctor.com www.sebringflightacademy.com www.midislandair.com

  www.bristellaircraft.com www.sea-plane.com

CREDIT APPLICATION AND MORE

   

                   

The Landing Doctor Code for Private Pilots

· “Fly the Plane”, “Fly the Plane”, “Fly the Plane”.

· Establish and use a Personal Limitations Checklist “PLC”

· Become the “Master and Commander” of your ship.

· After takeoff, remain in ground effect until reaching Vy of 72 KIAS.

· During climb, you must see over the nose. ”You must see over the nose.”  Having the horizon in sight will prevent the possibility of a departure stall. Use full power and Vy+10 to achieve Maneuvering Climb Speed of 82 KIAS before making any turns in the climb. 

· All stalls will be imminent.

· Departure stalls will only be practiced with a CFI on board.  

· Banks over 20 degrees will be avoided in the traffic pattern, especially during the turn from base to final. 

· If the pilot finds himself in the coffin corner because he/she overshot the turn from base to final, an immediate go-around will be initiated. 

· Defined Go-Around Point (DFGAP). At 200 feet AGL, the plane must be at 60 KIAS +10/– 5 knots, lined up with the center line and in its final flap setting of 20 or 30 degrees.

· All ballooned flares will result in a go-around. No balloons to a landing.

All landings will be to a full stop with a taxi back until accumulating a minimum of 100 hours PIC and 300 landings

· Never touch down before the numbers, as landing short of the runway beginning can result in a serious accident.

· Always land in the first third of the runway.

· Always land with 90 minutes of fuel on board. (FOD of 6)

· If the engine quits immediately switch tanks, then emergency check list.

· Do not leave the traffic pattern if the temperature dew point spread is less the 6 degrees.

· Only fly on clear nights when ground lights are visible.

· Do a more careful preflight when the plane has just come out of the shop.

· Always have a solid gold out.

Learn more at: www.landingdoctor.com Oct 6, 2018 abv.   

BRISTELL QUIZ

Bristell and Rotax QUIZ JAN 2019 (pdf)

Download

Credit application

Credit_Application (pdf)

Download

PERSONAL LIMITATIONS CHECKLIST BOOKLET

2 PAGE SUMMARY AND BOOKLET

PLC June 2019 rev 11pdf (pdf)

Download

PLC June 2019 rev 11 (pdf)

Download

CODE OF CONDUCT

   

                   

The Landing Doctor Code of Conduct March 8, 2019

· Make Safety your number one priority. Understand that your life and the life of future passengers depends on your good judgement.

· Establish and use our Personal Limitations Checklist “PLC”

· Follow the Landing Doctor rule of landing with 90 minutes of fuel.

· Do not turn in a climb until you have Vy + 10 kts or Vmcs, Velocity maneuvering climb speed.

· Recognize the increased risk of flying in inclement weather, night flight, flight during high winds, busy airport, over water or rough terrain,

· Seek excellence in airman ship by reading and flying regularly.

· Learn and adhere to the FAR’s and local laws. 

· Do not fly if you do not feel well and always have a solid gold out.

· Learn the practice of see and be seen. Fly aircraft with good visibility.

· Use technology for traffic avoidance.

· Monitor the radio to be aware of other traffic and be concise in your communication regarding your position and intentions.  

· Banks over 20 degrees will be avoided in the traffic pattern, especially during the turn from base to final. Give your passengers a smooth ride.

· If the pilot finds himself in the coffin corner because he/she overshot the turn from base to final, an immediate go-around will be initiated. 

· Defined Go-Around Point (DFGAP). At 200 feet AGL, the plane must be at 60 KIAS +10/– 5 knots, lined up with the center line and in its final flap setting of 20 or 30 degrees.

· Treat every aircraft as if it was yours.

· Brief passengers to inform you if they see other traffic and to be quiet when you are getting ready to land…the sterile cockpit.

· Do not refuel the aircraft with passengers on board.

· Use AirNav.com, Fore Flight, and FSS to prepare for a flight.

· Call 866-GA-SECURE if you see suspicious activity.866-427-3287

· Minimize the discharge of fuel and oil into the environment.

· Always load your flight plan data prior to taxiing.

· Drink responsibly. Never drink the night before a flight.

· Act with responsibility and courtesy and avoid vulgarity.

· Be humble, respectful, and show gratitude.   

FAQ, Frequently asked questions

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When will I start getting paid for my flying time?

When you become a LSA CFI in about 150 hours total time.

Do I need a commercial license and instrument rating?

NO.  You can start instructing students pursuing their Light Sport License without a commercial license or instrument rating. You will eventually get both.

When will I get my Private Pilots License.

Our LSA CFI's will be your primary instructors. They can only teach you while you are working towards your Light Sport Pilot's License. You will remain a student pilot until you have about 130 hours at which time you will get your Private Pilot's License.

When I get my Private Pilots License will I be able to take passengers?

No. Our program is fast track to an airline or corporate flying job.  We do not permit our students to take passengers. After becoming an LSA CFI, you can fly with another LSA CFI and share the cost of the rental with a 25% discount. You can both log the time if one of you is under the hood doing IFR training.

Can I get my Light Sport Pilot's License if I choose?

Yes. You can get your Light Sport Pilot's License if you like and your LSA CFI can give your continuing training, but the added cost for the written and flight test are not necessary or recommended.  You will not be able to rent Academy planes and take passengers.

Can I get my Private Pilot's before 130 hours if I want?

Yes, but your will not longer qualify for our finance programs and your LSA CFI will no longer be able to train you. You will also not be permitted to carry passengers in any Academy plane.